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Amid new immigration crackdown, CARICOM nationals will now find it harder to travel to the UK

By Dennis Adonis

LONDON, ENGLAND -- In preparation for the potential fallout from Brexit, UK Home Secretary Amber Rudd has announced that foreigners would no longer be able to take up jobs in the UK that Britons can do, while the number of people coming to Britain to work and study will be significantly reduced.

This means that Caribbean Community (CARICOM) nationals and other foreigners will now find it harder to obtain a visa to come to the UK to settle, work, or study.

In a wide ranging policy speech, Rudd explained that, under the new rules, employers can be jailed for employing someone who does not have the right to work there.

Property owners and landlords will also be sent to jail if they are found to be renting their property to illegal immigrants, while banks and other service providers can face heavy penalties for facilitating the financial or other business interests of an illegal immigrant.

Rudd also announced new plans regarding deportations, which she said would require the passing of new laws that would see migrants being deported faster and for less serious offences.

However, the hundreds of CARICOM nationals that travel to the UK annually for study or temporary work purposes will find it harder to do so, since visas will only be considered for certain categories of courses, while employment visas will only be possible if there is no one among Britain’s more than 65 million people that can do the job.

By comparison, it is already easier for a Guyanese citizen to obtain a visa to go to the US than to get one to come to the UK, where the entry requirements are relatively tough.

A large number of Caribbean nationals have settled in the UK and many of them are suspected to have either overstayed their permitted period to remain there, or settled there without the appropriate visa.

Courtesy: Guyana Guardian

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